top-cozumel-news-logo

We Save You Time and Resources By Curating Relevant Information and News About Cozumel, Mexico.

top-cozumel-news-logo
Please Share This Content with Your Friends, Family, or Business Associates

Wildlife Wonders In Cozumel: a Guide for Adventurers

By Tom Seest

Can You Explore For Wild Animals In Cozumel?

At TopCozumelNews, we help people traveling to Cozumel plan their trips and activities using information collected on our trips to the beautiful island.

Cozumel, Mexico’s Caribbean island, offers visitors stunning beaches, eco-tourism activities and miles-long Barrier Reef to make it a top tourist destination.
Cozumel also boasts some endemic species like the Coati, Vireo, and Collared Peccary that should not be missed. But there are other animals on the Island which may be harder to spot.

Can You Explore For Wild Animals In Cozumel?

Can You Explore For Wild Animals In Cozumel?

What Makes Coati a Fascinating Part of Cozumel’s Wildlife?

Coatis are medium-sized mammals native to South and Central America. They can be found in a variety of habitats such as jungles, forests and grasslands. Most commonly they’re found in South American rainforests, Mexico’s interior, and Central America’s northernmost rainforests.
They belong to the Procyonidae family, which includes raccoons. Omnivorous in nature, they feed on insects, fruits, bird eggs, rodents, and small reptiles such as lizards.
Coatis typically live alone, except during breeding season when they form bands of four to 20 animals composed of females and their young. Within these communities, coatis communicate with various sounds like chirping, grunting and snorting that convey happiness, victory after a fight, irritation or claims for food while foraging.
The coati is an incredibly adaptable animal, capable of living in a wide variety of habitats from rainforests to grasslands and even mountain slopes. It eats plants such as leaves and fruit as well as insects, tarantulas, birds, lizards, snakes and even crocodile eggs.
On Cozumel Island, there are several species of coati. These include the white-nosed coati (Nasua narica) and ring-tailed coati (Nasua nigripes). Unfortunately, the Cozumel Island coati has been classified as endangered due to encroachments on its habitat as well as other natural factors. To help safeguard this species, visitors are asked not to touch or feed them when visiting Cozumel.

What Makes Coati a Fascinating Part of Cozumel's Wildlife?

What Makes Coati a Fascinating Part of Cozumel’s Wildlife?

Did You Know Cozumel is Home to the Colorful Vireo Bird?

Cozumel Island is home to some incredibly unique wild animals. Many are endemic species of birds, mammals and reptiles that make the island their own.
The Vireo (Vireo bairdi) is one of the many endemic birds found on this island. It’s a large and stunning bird that thrives in tropical and subtropical dry forests as well as former forest habitats that have been degraded due to human activities.
Another unique bird found on Cozumel is the Black Catbird. This Yucatan endemic can be easily observed in its habitat of shrub-covered forests on Cozumel more than other sites in its region.
On Cozumel Island there is an endemic subspecies of this bird called Rufivertex; this subspecies has a rufous crown as opposed to the black one found elsewhere in Mexico and Central America.
These birds may be hard to identify by sight, but their bright orange lower mandible makes them easily distinguishable. These species inhabit a range of habitats across the Caribbean region.
Mexico is an amazing destination, boasting a vast variety of wildlife and natural splendor. With around 1,124 species of birds, 112 endemics, over 450 mammal and reptile species as well as the world’s highest concentration of Monarch butterflies in tropical fir forests; Mexico also boasts stunning coastal sand dunes and beaches to explore.

Did You Know Cozumel is Home to the Colorful Vireo Bird?

Did You Know Cozumel is Home to the Colorful Vireo Bird?

What Makes Cozumel’s Collared Peccary a Fascinating Sight?

The collared peccary (Pecari tajacu) is a wild animal found throughout the Southwestern United States and Central and South America. It can be identified by its black, gray or brown coat as well as a lighter colored “collar” around its shoulder.
Collared peccaries are primarily herbivorous, living in forests, woodlands and grasslands across their range. Their diet consists of roots, bulbs, fungi, nuts, seeds, berries, grasses and cacti.
They can be found in tropical and subtropical areas, as well as arid and semi-arid climates. They play a key role in riparian habitats by dispersing seeds and acorns to other plants in the ecosystem.
Their diet also includes insects, fruits, eggs and carrion. In semi-arid habitats they serve as a major food source for jaguars, pumas and coyotes.
The collared peccary is a common sight on the islands of the Yucatan Peninsula, where they inhabit various habitats. Colled peccaries are mostly observed in tropical rainforests and woodlands, and they have also been observed in arid and semi-arid regions.
Recently, Muknalia minima, a new peccary taxon was described from a dentary found in Muknal Cave near Tulum, Quintana Roo, Mexico. Although its morphologies suggested it to be its own species at first glance, closer examination revealed it to be Pecari tajacu with its distinctive snout.

What Makes Cozumel's Collared Peccary a Fascinating Sight?

What Makes Cozumel’s Collared Peccary a Fascinating Sight?

Have You Encountered a Boa Constrictor in Cozumel?

Boa constrictor snakes are nocturnal predators that kill their prey by constriction. Though found worldwide, they are most prevalent in South America’s Amazon rainforest.
They inhabit savannahs, grasslands and other cultivated sites. Ovoviviparous, they give birth to 12-64 young. With proper care and handling they can live in captivity for 20 years or longer.
In South and Central America, they are commonly found in tropical forests and savannahs. Although they can survive in near-desert climates, they prefer rainforest habitats.
Their solitary nature makes them difficult to spot, but they can be seen from above or by watching at night. Once tamed, these snakes make excellent pet snakes due to their easy care requirements and friendly disposition.
However, they are considered an invasive species in many parts of the world. Their impacts can range from habitat destruction to agricultural damage – particularly important issues in the Caribbean where they threaten native animal populations.
Boas was first introduced to Cozumel, an island in the Caribbean Sea, around 1971 and have since spread throughout the island. It is thought that their popularity as pets and as good scouts for game mammals prompted their introduction here. Now the boa population on Cozumel has grown rapidly and now dominates much of the landscape, leading to increased disturbance and disruption for plant communities.

Have You Encountered a Boa Constrictor in Cozumel?

Have You Encountered a Boa Constrictor in Cozumel?

What Tiny Creature Hides in the Wilds of Cozumel?

Cozumel is a tropical island situated in the Caribbean Sea. It’s an attractive tourist destination and home to numerous species of animals.
The Harvest Mouse is an endemic rodent to Cozumel Island, Mexico. It typically inhabits dense secondary forests and forest edge habitats.
This mouse belongs to the Crictid family and can be distinguished from other species by its reddish-fulvous fur and long, dark ears that seem nearly naked. It’s a small-bodied species with a tail that extends longer than its head-body length and dark rings around its eyes that differentiate it from other rodent species.
Mice in the wild tend to be herbivorous, hunting small mammals such as lizards and insects for food. Additionally, they feed on seeds and nuts.
They often live in nests or colonies and tend to congregate together. These gregarious birds tend to produce a large number of young.
The harvest mouse is an extremely vulnerable species. It faces threats such as predation by feral dogs and cats, competition with introduced non-native rats, and natural disasters like hurricanes that occasionally strike the island.

What Tiny Creature Hides in the Wilds of Cozumel?

What Tiny Creature Hides in the Wilds of Cozumel?

Have You Heard of the Elusive Cozumel Wren?

Cozumel, Mexico’s small island in the Caribbean Sea, is renowned for its miles-long barrier reef and abundant ecotourism opportunities. But its inland rainforests and mangrove forests are home to an array of animal life – from spiny-tailed iguanas to elusive coatis.
Birds are the most prevalent wild animal in Cozumel, and many of them are indigenous to the island. One notable exception is the Cozumel Wren, which is unique to Cozumel as one of only four endemic subspecies worldwide.
This small wren has a brown head, whitish underparts and prominent bars on its wings and tail. It feeds on insects and spiders from low tree branches and shrubs.
The wren is a Least Concern species found only on Cozumel. It primarily lives in forest edge habitats and can be vulnerable to habitat destruction as well as predators such as feral cats, dogs, and boa constrictors.
Other wild birds on Cozumel include the black-headed trogon, garterless trogon, lesson’s motot and turquoise-browed motot. We saw several of these at Celestun Causeway as well as during a boat tour of Lago Coba. Additionally, we encountered green kingfisher American pygmy kingfisher; bat falcon and peregrine falcon; finally we got great views of Coba’s ruins with binoculars! So when planning your trip to Cozumel, be sure to bring your binoculars along!

Have You Heard of the Elusive Cozumel Wren?

Have You Heard of the Elusive Cozumel Wren?

Please share this post with your friends, family, or business associates who may visit Cozumel.

Hotel Villa Deja Blue & Restaurant